Cinematography of Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull

Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull pic

Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull
Image: imdb.com

David Devlin of Bozeman, Montana, is an accomplished cinematographer with experience in film, television, and music videos. In collaboration with Janusz Kaminski, David Devlin has worked as second unit director of photography on several Steven Spielberg films, including Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull.

Nearly 20 years after the release of Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade, the Indiana Jones franchise was launched again with Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull. The fourth Indiana Jones movie presented cinematographers with some unique challenges. First, there were several complicated scenes involving intense action with simultaneous dialogue. In addition, those involved with the film desired to honor the legacy of cinematographer Douglas Slocombe, who worked on the first three movies. To do so, cinematographers aimed to recreate the vintage feel of the original trilogy while employing modern techniques in order to appeal to a more sophisticated audience.

Released in 2008, Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull movie picks up in 1957 with Indiana Jones (Harrison Ford) finding himself enmeshed in a Soviet plot to uncover the mysteries surrounding the crystal skills, a set of artifacts. The movie had a budget of $185 million and grossed over $780 million worldwide at the box office.

Realistic Depictions of War on Film

David Devlin is a professional cinematographer who currently resides in Bozeman, Montana. Prior to taking up residency in Bozeman, Montana, David Devlin worked on several Steven Spielberg films, including War Horse and Saving Private Ryan.

Steven Spielberg’s Saving Private Ryan, released in 1997, is consistently referred to as one of the most realistic depictions of war on film. The movie is particularly praised for its portrayal of American forces landing on Omaha Beach during the closing stages of World War II. Veterans of war regularly point to Saving Private Ryan, as well as Spielberg’s HBO series The Pacific, as shining examples of both the camaraderie and complicated personal interactions that occur in the military and the technical aspects of war, such as officer rankings and weapons operations.

Movie critics and general audiences responded to the Saving Private Ryan, with the $12 million opening sequence causing many D-Day veterans to turn away or leave the theater. Spielberg’s cinematic approach to battle has been heralded by other directors as well, including director and screen writer Quentin Tarantino.